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foundation. that is why i am running for a second term as the president of the united states. >> find any speech from the democratic or republican conventions on line at the c- span.org video library. >> paul ryan campaign to in the battleground state of nevada on friday. she talked about a new trade policy. utilizing domestic energy resources. this is about 20 minutes. ♪ >> hey, everybody. how're you doing over there? hello. wow. look at you all. man. it is so great to see you. thank you so much for coming out. i love you, too, man. thank you for coming out and stand in line. i appreciate it. i want to thank you for something else. thank you for those electoral votes and thank you for making mitt romney the next president of the united states. we have got a job to do, friends. and you know what? we have a lot of people who need jobs. and we have a big choice ahead of us. the question is, are we going to stick with four more years of the same? the same path? no. are we going to have a country in debt, doubt, and decline? or are we going to do what we need to do to get people back to wor
the united states, i am sure libya receives money. it was even greater because the american ambassador -- i am supportive of the arab spring. the times and elsewhere, i said to myself, they are not great people. but they are people that surely will turn out nice to us. it doesn't make any sense. >> the events of the last week, the embassy attacks, it will result in a further ongoing shift of jewish americans changing -- >> i think there is a little more to follow. the shift in special elections indicated deep distrust of this administration. that was clear. what the administration said, you heard what the state said. the message was sent loud and clear. for a while, i think it was always together. we have heard the state department say that they have taken every reasonable step. we have heard the quote from the ambassador suggesting he was comfortable and these people love me. it's not true. he issued a statement saying he is very concerned about his own safety. again, we have an information gap. that is coming home to roost. this will build. >> today's new york times, the interview with th
leaders are leading the reform process. united states is committed to protecting the space for civil society to operate and the critical role plays in transitioning democracy all over the world. with a greater emphasis on a broader range of u.s. power, president obama succeeded in laying a new foundation for leadership in the world. nowhere do you see this more clearly than the commitment to the area that you focus on for the remainder of my remarks, the development in poverty and prosperity. the presiden was unapologetic, putting to rest the old myth that development is near charity. rejecting the notion that they were condemned by the gains in human developments. as such, the national security strategy recognizes development in the moral, strategic, and economic imperatives. on that day he announced the new u.s. global development policy. the premise is on the conviction that the ultimate goal of foreign assistance and development is to create the conditions with the assistance are no longer needed. focusing on helping these broad base -- is broadbased economic growth, prioritizing
know one thing about him. he does not fail. let's hear it for the next president of the united states. [applause] >> thanks, sweetie. that's quite an introduction here. i got how many introductions tonight? anyone else want to offer an introduction? thank you. this really is a critical time for the country, and i think a time of choice. elections are always about choice. i think the choice is in more stark relief than most electrics. i think in part because of where the country is. i think when you have $16 trillion in debt, when you see places like europe facing fiscal calamity or crisis, while you recognize these are critical times, what you have in this country, 23 million americans out of work, 23 million. when half the kids coming out of college can't find work or work consistent with an education that includes college, think about that? this is america. what's happened? and so the president and i offered two very distinct paths. his path is one which has been not just spoken about, we've seen it. we don't have to guess what his path might look like or what he would do, because h
the united states as the move towards a democracy. the obama administration has said it is considering using sanctions against myanmar, also known as burma. this is one hour and 15 minutes. >> well, welcome to all of you. this is my first official of bent as the new president. what a thrill, frankly, to be here with you. her first visit to the united states in 20 years. no. a 40 years. and she chose to come to the institute for her first public address. we have wonderful partners in the society. and the blue moon a society. we have a great relationship with the state department of secretary clinton today. a number of her colleagues are here. kurt campbell. in addition, i would like to particularly recognize a couple of our board members. without her, i do not think this event would have occurred. i would like to thank her for coming. i like to turn things over. [applause] >> i join with jim. i want to tell you that this is an extremely large and important a pleasure that we have in welcoming all of you here today. it is an event in honor of remarkable individual. we welcome you and your dele
>>> this is "gps," the "global public square." welcome to all of you in the united states and around the world, i'm fareed zakaria. we have a smart show for you today. we'll talk mostly about what else has been going on in the world outside of the democratic national convention. >>> things have heated up with regard to iran and israel, with syria, with afghanistan. i've got a great panel to discuss all of it. anne-marie slaughter, richard haass, martin indyk. >>> then, a different spin on a familiar question in the presidential campaign. will americans be better off four years from now? one of the world's top bankers, roger altman, thinks so. harvard's niall ferguson isn't so sure. >>> next up, can't we just predict the election results now and be done with it? i'll ask nate silver, "the new york times'" brilliant statistician. >>> also, the crisis you don't know enough about that could have a big impact around the globe. >>> first, here's my take. both conventions are done, and what can we say about the upcoming campaign and election? well, one hearty prediction about ele
that it is going as you will understand the united states we understand of madison and jefferson and washington how they form the country but would be a very good basis for understanding what was going on in the united states so current china was very much shaped by deng xiaoping. he came to power in 1978 and was the dominant person right up until 1992 for the period of about 14 years. what i thought i would do in the brief time today i was told to not talk for more than 20 minutes would be to talk about some of the forces that shaped what he was and what he did to transform china because 1978 the country that he inherited had a per capita income of less than $100 per capita. now is estimated somewhere rs/6000 and it's on the path of that he is headed on. there is almost no migration from the countryside in the city and since he came perhaps 200 million have moved from the countryside to the town and the city. when he came to power the country was still involved in the cultural revolution and the relevant nettie toward each other and he worked to unite the country to set it on the new path. what ar
. i pledge allegiance to the flag of the united states of america and to the republic for which it stands, one nation under god, indivisible, with liberty and justice for all. the presiding officer: the clerk will read a communication to the senate. the clerk: washington, d.c, september 21, 2012. to the senate: under the provisions of rule 1, paragraph 3, of the standing rules of the senate, i hereby appoint the honorable richard blumenthal, a senator from the state of connecticut, to perform the duties of the chair. signed: daniel k. inouye, president pro tempore. mr. reid: mr. president? the presiding officer: the majority leader smed. mr. reid: i had move to proceed to calendar number 504. the presiding officer: the clerk will report. the clerk: motion to proceed to calendar number 504, s. 3525, a bill to protect and enhance opportunities for recreational hunting, fish, and shooting and for other purposes. mr. reid: mr. president? the presiding officer: the majority leader. mr. reid: the next hour will be equally divided between the two leader leaders who are their designees.
to be realistic about how we can tackle these challenges. if there is a crisis that i see in the united states for the long term, it is not the temporal issue of how we will deal with money. because i am very confident we will be able to deal with that. it is how will we bring that -- bring back our sense of what we can accomplish together as americans when we are realistic about those challenges. that is the thing i think about the word "crisis" in this country. >> mayor castro is not the first to suggest that. for 10 years now, we heard that the government is not asking all of us to do enough. >> it is interesting. the word "sacrifice," when i hear a politician say that, it usually means grab your wallet. it usually means increasing taxes. and i will give president obama credit to in his the first presidential candidate since walter mondale to run explicitly on a platform that he will raise taxes. >> he is saying he will raise taxes on the wealthy. >> according to the supreme court, he already has raised taxes. that was the basis on which the supreme court of held obamacare, that it was a ta
steer america towards a fiscal cliff. we have voted 65 days this year in the united states senate. there are a number of things. you raise the one about the payroll tax cut, we haven't passed an appropriations bill this year. why is that? harry reid laid it out earlier in "the national journal." forget passing bills, the democrats want to pass the blame game. i see this. we haven't figured out if they are going to pay doctors next year. 30% cut. the president says he has extended the life of medicare, only if he lowers what they pay doctors who take care of doctors 30% and freezes that for the next 10 years. for somebody on medicare, they will have a difficult time finding a doctor to take care of them. host: it appears something fleeds to be done. your payroll tax conferee last year agreed to extend the payroll tax cut holiday for another year. are you in favor of doing so again? guest: i voted against the conference committee report. i don't think it's going to be extended this year. we are looking at tax rates going up. death tax coming back in a much more onerous way. there is
-year plan. how many of you have studied the plan? you know, in the united states and u.s. context, the entire idea of five-year plans sounds preposterous. they are taken serious in china and this one in particular is like a chain in the curve for the chinese economy. it says basically looking backwards china's successes have almost been enough low-wage factoriescome the building, road roads and all the rasputin the future under this plan they want to have more high-tech. they want infotech industry from a biotech industry coming clean take energy and aerospace industry. so the idea of the country can move from its current level of technology is something played out in this industry and a lot of others. another major theme you see about china in this field and others is the style of what i think of as the real estate centric theory of modernization. if you look for an explanation of almost anything happening in china now and say well why is the seaport go in there? why is this ancient village removed? why is x, y or z happening? real estate deals may not be the only answer, but usu
, president of the united states of america. >> mr. president, mr. secretary general, fellow delegates, ladies and gentleman, i would like to begin today by telling you about an american named chris stevens. chris was born in a town called grass valley, california, the son of a lawyer and a musician. as a young man, chris joined the peace corps, and taught english in morocco. and he came to love and respect the people of north africa and the middle east. he would carry that commitment throughout his life. as a diplomat, he worked from egypt to syria, from saudi arabia to libya. he was known for walking the streets of the cities where he worked -- tasting the local food, meeting as many people as he could, speaking arabic, listening with a broad smile. chris went to benghazi in the early days of the libyan revolution, arriving on a cargo ship. as america's representative, he helped the libyan people as they coped with violent conflict, cared for the wounded, and crafted a vision for the future in which the rights of all libyans would be respected. and after the revolution, he supported the birt
are furious with the united states -- if you talk to the pakistanis, we want the opportunity, and we want that kind of social link. it would help to build ties with the united states, and put a lot more of our concentration into society where the face of society is the face of your neighbor, the engineer who works in a ditch, the face of a student, the face of your child who has come to america, etc.. our focus on what pakistan is. i am not sure that is going to be possible in the next two years, and this is my second point. i will get back to the international element in a minute. i think that it is right for us to make sure that we focus on the issue of the counterinsurgency issues that we have. we have to deal with that correctly. we have to deal with al qaeda. we have to do with international terrorism. until 2014, it is unlikely in my mind that we can have a major change. that does not mean we cannot do our hallmark. it does not mean we cannot get, for example, the dynamic, philanthropic sector of pakistan to work with the thorough -- very dynamic philanthropic sector in the states,
they hear that the president of the united states is no longer necessarily categorically calling egypt an ally? >> reporter: well, you know, quite honestly there's been a lot of confusion about what the u.s. role is right now and how the u.s. feels about egypt. before our revolution began, there was and continued to be a lot of anti-u.s. sentiment because of this support by various u.s. administrations for dictators in this region. but hearing the statement today, i think people are thinking, all right, well, whose side are you on because we're trying to get this revolution working and it has definitely confused a lot of people. >> all right, thank you so much for your time. i want to go directly to golden, colorado, where the president is speaking about the four who were killed in libya. >> serve in difficult and dangerous places all around the world, to advance the interests and the values that we hold dear as americans. and a lot of times their work goes unheralded, it doesn't get a lot of attention. but it is vitally important. we enjoy our security and our liberty because of the s
they're policies are, look at the map. look at the map of the united states in terms of seas, prom mentors, harbors these, coast of the united states, the 13 colonies, was jam packed with great natural harbors. the whole coast of africa, thousands of miles, relatively few good harbors which hindered africa's development, but the east coast was packed with them, and the united states, the continental core of the u.s. was the last resource rich part of the zone that was settled and waterways flowing in a convenient east-west fashion than the rest of the world's waterways combined. so i'm saying that americans -- we're important not only because of their ideas and their democracy but because of where we happen to live as well, and so that's why these things, like mountains matter. the himalayas matter. they have allowed india and china to develop into who completely disstink great world civilizations without having much to do with each other, through long periods of history. >> so let's take that image that you offered of america, this amazingly suitable geographical place with all th
. the united states drew a clear, red line. iran backed off. different lines can be drawn in the i iranian nuclear program. but to be credible, a line must be drawn first and foremost in one vital part of their program -- on their efforts to enrich uranium. let me explain why. any bomb consists of an explosive material and a mechanism to ignite it. the simplest example is fuse.der in and a you light the fuse and set off the gunpowder. the gunpowder is enriched uranium in regards to iran's nuclear program. the fuse is a detonator. for iran, amassing enough uranium is far more difficult than producing a nuclear fuse. for a country like iran, it takes many, many years to enrich uranium for a bomb. that requires thousands of center fuses spinning in tandem in big industrial plants. those are green plants are visible. they are still vulnerable. in contrast, iran could produce a record detonator, the fuse, in a lot less time. maybe under a year. maybe only a few months. the detonator can be made in a small workshop the size of the classroom. it might be difficult to find and target that workshop
, it is prescriptive that is in the dna of the united states. it is the way america works. this is very crudely put. the pakistan the narrative. the american narrative is similar the crude, but similarly useful. we give these guys tons of money. every time, they betray us. we keep coming back to them times of need. we give them money, but are they grateful? no, they are spiteful. it is emotional on both sides. it is not just a question of analysis on the way countries work. it is a question of the betrayal of people you want to love. there is this desire for more than just a relationship. not just a one-night stand, we want marriage. and the disappointment that comes with that. with those two narratives, it is my contention in 2008, with the end of dictatorship, there is an effort by people in both parties here in washington, but lead as the democrats came in, there is this effort to say we will break out of this narrative, we will break out of this straitjacket of the up and down relationship and we will put our money where our mouth is. we measure the tool we use to show we are serious, money. th
to the united states from the other states of the european union over for lunch. okay? germans in the chair, ambassadors from america, from the e.u. states over for lunch. he would then have an american coming in and be the lunchtime entertainment. the american-led come and give the lunchtime talk. i'm not sure who else was there. i would expect the secretary of state was invited, secretary defense. and the central intelligence agency. so i get invited and say okay, i've got a representative from every country in the european union. what makes an interesting speech? i've got it. let's talk about reconditions, interrogations'. so i did. [laughter] and i began the conversation -- i had a great staff at the cia. you are blessed as a people with the talent and morality of the folks in your service and i had a wonderful stuff and great speeches. was rear i would let anybody go with almost irresistible temptation to fool around with someone else's and i would make changes, but this was so important. an awful lot of it i wrote, and i remember page two or page three of the speech, you know, about m
. the united states of america with their two presence in afghanistan with peace and stability, then you are personally the national interest of pakistan because the known and unknown objective of pakistan within the region is also peace and stability. why talk about the regional approach is to give you confidence for your buck the talk of first doing that. that she must not look at us, but she must look at us from the lens have today in the toasty today the future that pakistan wants for itself as that of peace and stability in. and we have a peaceful, stable region, everything else will work great. so is a march on i think we need to send each other messages. one of the means is to send that message out, that we are keen to work together to ensure that in afghanistan we are able to achieve together long sustainable fees, less admitted that we are not able to achieve. so let's work together. this put our energies together, our resources together. let's not blame each other. let's find time to sit together to work through this together because as i said, this is something that in this re
romney said take a look at gdp numbers over in china and russia, the united states is falling behind those countries. he said that the united states needs to be doing better than europe. that's one of his big go-to lines. europe is not working for europe. it isn't going to work here in the united states. so these two campaigns are going to be going at it over the economy. we heard president obama throw out a very attack line talking about the mother jones video that came out. he said in front of that crowd, he said when i look out at this crowd i don't see a lot of victims, referring to what mitt romney said in that hidden camera video. they're talking about defense stuff. but the economy looming over everything else. >> thank you, jim. appreciate it as always. president obama and mitt romney face to face. first presidential debate wednesday night. watch it live, 7:00 eastern or cnn.com. >>> also another huge story that has everybody talking. no kidding. the nfl and its refs. right now nfl commissioner roger goodell is taking questions at a presser in new york. let's see what he's go
just search "state of the union." "fareed zakaria gps" is next for our viewers here in the united states. >>> this is "gps," the "global public square." welcome to all of you in the united states and around the world. i'm fareed zakaria. on today's show we'll bring you some of the best interviews of the year. first up, the most powerful man in america. no, not what you're thinking. that's what some people call grover ronquist. who? he is behind the gop pledge never to raise taxes. then, who really creates jobs in this country? is it the 1% or the 99%? i'll talk to two 1%-ers who vehemently disagree. >>> next up, the politics of outer space. america won the race to the moon, but that was 40 years ago. the u.s. is essentially sitting on the bench in the current space race. will that hurt it back here on earth? >>> also, the world's great historian of the middle east, bernard lewis, on the past and future on that part of the world. >>> but first, here's my take. so i thought i would take a step away from politics, the conventions and the campaigns and look around the world. you know,
that the united states has to survive. it has to survive to show the world that the representative governments can work. the kids in 1848 in a series of revolutions in europe as they see it a failed as the democratic revolution, and so they see the united states this is it, the world's last shot. it has to work your order will never be tried again. so the states think they can destroy the government which is how the unions see it because they don't like to get elected. they said self-government doesn't work, so we have to prove that the thing can survive and that's how they start. but you don't have to be in a very long before they begin to think why do they get into this to begin with? talk to this virus and slaves -- southerners and slaves and they got into the problem to begin with because the institution of slavery. if you want to solve a problem, the only way to do it is to root out the cause. so union soldiers made a shift much earlier than i had anticipated. the big shift begins in the summer of 1861 with soldiers beginning to write home to their families and elected officials to say that i
to millions suffering from hiv aids. second is to foster a substantial united states strategic interests. perhaps military or diplomatic or economic. third is another purpose and one that i think has to receive much more attention and higher priority. in a romney administration and that is aid that elevates people and brings about lasting change in communities and nations. here is an example. a lot of americans including myself are troubled by developments in the middle east. syria has witnessed the killing of tens of thousands of people. the presidents of egypt is a member of the muslim brotherhood. our ambassador to libya was assassinated in a terrorist attack. iran is moving toward nuclear weapons capability. we somehow feel we are at the mercy of events rather than shaping events. i am often asked why. what can we do about it? to ease the suffering and enter and the hate and violence? religious extremism is part of a problem but that is not the whole story. the population of the middle east is very young particularly in comparison to the population of the developed nations. typically
through small local banks or sometimes large local banks. what happens is people in the united states and europe who fund these things generally go through an intermediary so they give their money to institutions such as kiva, a famous one that you -- deutsche bank, citibank, the traditional wall street companies, dedicated microfinance funses such as blue orchard, the biggest one in the order, and then you have the foundations. so in d.c. we have two examples, such as the foundation u.s.a. and calvert foundation but there are whole hot of these institutions. you give your money to one of these intermediary asks they apparently invest this in the -- in your best interests and in the best interests of the poor by channeling this money to these small banks in developing countries that are going to do effective microfinance. that's the idea. that's the theory. >> well, this book has been promoted and my understanding is that members of the church congregations, people making responsible investments are flocking to this opportunity. tell us about some of the people providing the money. >>
the temperature cool. nay are actively working behind the scenes. >> i know the government of the united states is quietly talking japan and china. we have failed our growing relationship with china. >> amitage view reflects growing concern among american officials. the u.s. government remain a neutral stance. because japan controls the territory japan u.s. security treaty extends to the islands. chinese vessels have been navigating the waters around the island. japan coast guard crews have been keeping an eye on them. obviousers fear an absence of dialogue and the crisis mechanism could lead to unintended consequences which could mean the united states would not be able to stay neutral. >> japan and china are said to mark 40 years. organizers have cancelled a number of events. government officials celebrated the friendship year for japan china people to people exchanges. as of thursday 29 events in both countries have been cancelled or postponed. japan airlines reports that about 12,000 seats for its group tour bookings have been cancelled. some car dealerships in china have scrapped their pla
, arms, and legs. >> what they said in the united states 20 years earlier. jazz, people don't know this, first inception in the 1920s was attacked roundly as primitive jungle music bringing down american youth. stalin and eastern europe said exactly the same things with the same words later on. stossel: rock n roll then came. >> more popular than jazz. millions of fans across eastern europe. by 1980s disco and rock in the 1980s were enormously popular throughout the communism world. stossel: relaxed the rules because they were losing. >> it was too late. then if he continues to repress this energy, this desire for freedom and pleasure, he'd lose. he let it go. western acts came in, and it took off from there. stossel: left the acts in, surprising. bruce springsteen drew a huge crowd in east germany. we have a clip of him singing "born in the usa." ♪ born in the usa stossel: in east germany, this is remarkable because so many people were there singing along to "born in the usa," and they were not allowed in the usa. >> that's right. great evidence this is enormous popularity signaling
. there was no clear consensus about what is the ultimate goal of the united states and europe. is the goal of the one hand or is this just a customs union? it's so dissimilar as many have pointed to the formation of the united states. but here again the idea was let's not try to reach agreement on the end result because there is no consensus but let's take a step at a time and develop the institutions necessary as the problems come up. what wasn't perceived as the context of which the huge decisions would have to be taken was the mother of all financial crises from the united states. so, the pressures are far greater than we are anticipating and the year being forced into making big decisions. we are going to find out if they are willing to make the sacrifices necessary to sustain and. yesterday the peterson institute presented an interesting study of spain and italy whether it was sustainable the conclusion is of the plausible scenarios and the answer is yes. under the circumstances it seemed to me surprising if the project would be abandoned in a sense in that context. >> we and interesting meeting
. and i should say this too. the israeli prime minister, before embarking to the united states, made remarks briefly yesterday on the holiest day, right before the holiest day in the jewish calendar, yom kippur. he said this speaking about mahmoud ahmadinejad speaking at the united nations on that very same day. and i quote. on this day when we pray to be inscribed to the book of life a platform was given to a dictatorial regime who tries at every step to sentence us to death. it is position of the israeli prime minister if not stopped iran will developed enriched-uranium that could be used to make a bomb as early as spring of 2013. we expect him to elaborate on that in just the next few moments. megyn. megyn: david lee miller, thank you so. there was, as we've always heard from iran some bellicose language from its leader in the united nations. israel will have the chance to respond after mr. netanyahu speaks, we will be joined live right here for reaction and perspective by general jack keane and ambassador john bolton. don't miss it. busy afternoon. >> the cost of food is up. the
this country faces the starkest choice for president of the united states that has in that least my lifetime. that means in all of your lifetime. but for all the talk governor romney and congressman ryan have engaged in, they do not have the courage yet to tell you what their policies for this nation really are. it will shock you, i have the courage to tell you this morning with their policies are. [laughter] it's amazing if you listen to them. they talk so much about how they care about medicare. you would think it was a republican idea the way they talk about it. you think it was republicans supporting it. they talk about how they want to preserve it. they do it sincerely and talk about how they sincerely want to preserve and protect the benefits for all those people, guaranteeing all those people on medicare now, the 30 million seniors that nothing will change. if you listen to them these days, you would think that had been a republican plan all along. that's what they say and that is what they exude believe, and these are facts. they don't tell you that there fan with a meat -- their pla
around van heusen in particular and arrow, the two larges brands in the united states. then our sportswear izod, a major roll-out with jc penney with the brand there. continued strong growth in our department store base, particularly macy's. that brand continues to perform and regain positioning. >> jc penney is a battleground. people worried that perhaps they are not doing well on your conference call you made it clear stores within stores are fantastic for your future. >> you know, we think it is a great way to show case our brands. we have seen early results and i'm talking about very early. ten days worth of sales so far as new shops have gone in. we have seen good sales performance in those stores. ron johnson from jc penney has talked about the transformation he's taking the company through. clearly he's been up front about the rocky issues he's had to keel wi deal with. they have a clear path. we are being as supportive as we can with them, not only with izod but with van heusen. we are a big part of the dress furnishings business to move the consumer forward. >> do they
against the united states. that is likely to change today because we have friday prayers and there will be more widespread demonstrators today. but there are individual circumstances in each country which will play out in the future of relations. so the conditions in yemen are very different from egypt and we have the drone strikes in yemen which feed into anti-americanism there it and egypt, it's probably more to do with the closeness of the british regime. libya is more difficult. you have the risk of increased presence in the east which is kind of feeding the instability there. so a lot of different local dynamics at play. >> david, while we concentrate on this of course we're still working out what's going on with the really big story. which i don't want to downgrade it, but iraq of course. and how is that going to pap out? >> in terms of -- >> nuclear weapons. >> it remains very difficult because we're still trying to analyze what the israeli intentions are. that's the key going forward certainly before the u.s. election. there is a widespread fear that perhaps the i
of people protesting this anti-muslim film made here in the united states. dagen: rick leventhal from fox news joins us live. rick. >> the pakistani government declared today a national holiday, love for the prophet. nonviolence, but things got ugly fast. and across the streets of pakistan including islamabad to keep protesters from approaching the consulate there. and demonstrations in karachi, five movie theaters were burned and a couple of banks on fire. and one officer killed there. and in peshawar, hundreds of demonstrators set movie theaters on fire and police used tear gas. at some point opened the fire on the people and hit a pakistani news vehicle and killed the driver there. and they were marching through the streets and protesting the anti-muslim film and burned a makeshift coffin draped with an american flag and burned an effigy of president obama and around middle east and africa and security has been beefed up at a number of u.s. and western embassies around the region as a precaution, guys. dagen: rick, thank you for that reporting. connell: and nicole, the new york stock e
's been stuck in the 9 $9 to $12 for almost a ye now. >> it's fort d in the united states, and there's the ford from overseas. europe bad, latin-american, bad. bed bath and beyond, norfolk southern, two different kind of businesses. norfolk is going off the rails, bed bad, looking good. >> coming up, bargain shopping? retailers have been on the rise, but after perusing the aisles cramer has --. >>> and later, making dough, dominos has been -- find us if it can claim the upper crust of the pizza population, when the ceo breaks some news in cramer's exclusive. just ahead. >>> plus 'tis the season? millions of people around the world will get their hands on the highly anticipated crown jewel of the apple empire. iphone 5, but don't, get ready to though everything you think you know about tech out the window. cramer's looking beyond apple and what he says may surprise you. all coming up on "mad money." >>> any moment there's stocks that might rally for a week or month or a season before they only go out of style. and then there are the long-term opportunities that we search for all the t
that the united states and that is enfuego. that's focus. then the ford from overseas. europe, bad. latin-america bad. guess what? two against one. can't own it. bed bath and beyond, norfolk southern. two different companies, two industries. norfolk is calling off the rails. i don't want to be no norfolk. bed bath, looking good. stay with cramer. >>> kwuming up, bargain shopping? retailers have been on the rise. but after perusing the aisles, cramer spotted bun stock that could be available in a discount. as the holiday season heats up, can this make you a cool profit in stick around it find out. >>> and later, making dough. domino says increasing its share of the pie and giving investors a healthy slice of the profit. but can this pizza party continue? find out if it can flame the upper crust of the peas why population, when the ceo breaks news in cramer's exclusive. just ahead. >>> plus, tis the season. in just hours. millions of people around the world, will get their hands on the highly anticipated crown jewel of the apple empire. iphone 5. but tonight, get ready to throw everything y
be accurately described as young. >> thank you so much. there is no organization in the united states that is better at serving as a forum for the principal legal issues of the day. i have been asked to comment as well on the voting rights and same-sex marriage issues. she has done such a good job in describing these cases. the two points i would make about same-sex and voting rights act cases is why would the justices get involved because these cases are not on the docket. the court family takes only one out of 100 cases. but doma has been invalidated by a federal court of appeals. if we're going to strike down a federal statute, that is our job, the supreme court's job. the voting rights act cases, several of them come on appeal. generally, you have to ask the supreme court to grant review in your case. but there are tiny slivers of cases in the united states code that allow them to go to the supreme court could but the voting rights cases they almost have to take. they suggested very serious concerns about the constitutionality of section 5. they have a lot of interest in this issu
clock on the convention floor. this is why. the united states pushing that 16 trillion mark yesterday. what does that mean for a president who wants a second term. we'll discuss and dismiss the debt like they do. chris christy said what is wrong with washington? well nancy pelosi. >> she is part of the problem. it is true. listen, any of the leaders are up there if they are not trying to make a difference. >> brian: chris christy sounded off and sang a bit with jimmie fallon. we'll bring it out because you were probably nodding off when he was talking to chris christie. all next for the 2012 election . ♪ ♪ "fox and friends". >> >> gretchen: good morning. i needed that election surge to get me through hump day. i needed that election. thank you for making my day. >> brian: we are wednesday and two more days left of the convention and we'll know here until friday morning. yesterday it was clear, we need more time and we are off to a great start and need more time. >> steve: plus we might need more umbrellas. supper time, it was coming down. >> brian: i didn't notice that. >> gretche
was the biggest terrorist incident before 9/11 that the united states history had. a man who had been on my secret service detail had transferred there because he thought it would be a great place to raise his children. he was killed that day. along with other people. i had, like every politician, on occasion, gotten upset. and referred to government bureaucrats. i promised myself i would never use those two words together for the rest of my life. i would treat those people who serve our country with respect whether they are in uniform, law enforcement, fire fighters, and the other thing. [applause] that is it. if you are working for the future, i think the president's plan is better. i know the economic plan is better. and i know it will not amount to a hill of beans if you do not register and vote and get your friends to. so do it. god bless you all. [cheers and applause] ♪ >> have you visited the c-span campaign 2012 website? it can watch events from the campaign trail. you can also read what the candidates are saying on major issues like the economy, the deficit, national security, and immig
who is saying there is great uncertainty about how the united states will deal with its high debt levels. that may be the case. perhaps deflecting some attention there back to the u.s. certainly it's getting its fair share of attention in the u.s. during campaign season, but nevertheless an interesting comment from the finance minister this morning. >>> let's check in on the equity markets. we've mentioned some of the big decliners in the luxury goods place after burberry came out with a statement talking about slowing growth in the most recent quarter. overall markets are down by just about half of 1%. that's the stoxx 600, so it gives you a pretty good view of the region as a whole. specifically the ftse 100 moving lower by 0.35%. the ibex is suffering to the tune of about 1.25%. in fact we put it in twice just to make sure you pay attention. in the bond markets, the ten year germany bund at 1.53%. yields in spap ain are still of course elevated, and italy 5.23%. and in the uk, the ten year lower 1.75. and on the legality of the esm, we also do have the election in the netherlan
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